Welcome to Kat Dennings Diaries, a fansite dedicated to the actress Kat Dennings. She became known to the general public as the sassy waitress Max Black in the comedy 2 Broke Girls and in the shoes of the witty Darcy Lewis of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Kat can now be seen in Hulu's new show Dollface. We aim to be your go-to source for Kat goodness and offer a comprehensive archive of her career and fierceness.
Kat's Books & Wine Club   Kat's Garden   Kat's Kitchen   Original articles
2bg_s05e17_pp_286229.jpg
2bg_s05e17_pp_286129.jpg
2bg_s05e17_pp_286029.jpg
2bg_s05e17_pp_285929.jpg
2bg_s05e17_pp_285829.jpg
2bg_s05e17_pp_285729.jpg
2bg_s05e17_pp_285629.jpg
2bg_s05e17_pp_285529.jpg
2bg_s05e17_pp_285429.jpg
2bg_s05e17_pp_285229.jpg
2bg_s05e17_pp_285329.jpg
2bg_s05e17_pp_285129.jpg
Check out our photo gallery with 30'000+ pictures of Kat and growing daily!
Kat’s Library

This page features (certainly only of) a few of Kat’s literary favouries. Why don’t you take one as your suggestion for your next wine club, I mean book club meeting?

Favourite BooksOther Books

A Wild Sheep Chase: A Novel by Haruki Murakami

His life was like a recurring nightmare: a train to nowhere. But an ordinary life has a way of taking an extraordinary turn. Add a girl whose ears are so exquisite that, when uncovered, they improve sex a thousand-fold, a runaway friend, a right-wing politico, an ovine-obsessed professor and a manic-depressive in a sheep outfit, implicate them in a hunt for a sheep, that may or may not be running the world, and the upshot is another singular masterpiece from Japan’s finest novelist.

The third novel by Japanese author Haruki Murakami. First published in Japan in 1982, it was translated into English in 1989. It is an independent sequel to Pinball, 1973, and the third book in the so-called “Trilogy of the Rat”. It won the 1982 Noma Literary Newcomer’s Prize.
Murakami blends elements of American and English literature with Japanese contexts, exploring post-WWII Japanese cultural identity.


Pure Drivel by Steve Martin

Steve Martin has always been one of the most intelligent of comedians (you won’t find Adam Sandler writing a play about Einstein and Picasso anytime soon), but this intelligence is manifested in gymnastically absurdist flights of fancy, rather than the politically informed riffs typical of performers like Lenny Bruce. Pure Drivel is a collection of pieces, most of them written for the New Yorker, that demonstrate Martin’s playful way with words and his unerring ability to create a feeling of serendipitous improvisation even on the printed page.


Silent Snow, Secret Snow by Conrad P. Aiken

The story tells of a boy named Paul Hasleman, who finds it increasingly difficult to pay attention to his classwork, and grows more distant from his family. He is, instead, becoming more and more entranced by daydreaming about snow. This began when he was lying in bed one morning, awaiting the approach of the postman. Unable to hear the expected footfalls, the boy imagines that they have been muffled by newly fallen snow, and is surprised when he looks out the window and discovers that there is no snow on the ground.

Paul’s increasing distance and indifference to the world around him alarms his parents. He has to struggle to get dressed and converse with others, because of the allure of his daydream about snow. They eventually call in a physician, who makes a house call to examine Paul. After revealing that he likes to think about snow, Paul tears himself away from the meeting with the physician and retires to his room. When his mother pursues him, he tells her “Go away… I hate you!”, and is lost in the dreamworld of the snow.

This is Conrad Aiken’s best-known short story, often included in anthologies of classic American horror and fantasy short fiction. It appeared in The Collected Stories of Conrad Aiken in 1934, and since then has been widely anthologized.


Stories by Katherine Mansfield

Although Katherine Mansfield was closely associated with D.H. Lawrence and something of a rival of Virginia Woolf, her stories suggest someone writing in a different era and in a vastly different English. Her language is as transparent as clean glass, yet hovers on the edge of poetry. Her characters are passionate men and women swaddled in English reserve — and sometimes briefly breaking through. And her genius is to pinpoint those unacknowledged and almost imperceptible moments in which those people’s relationships — with one another and themselves — change forever. This collection (of 28 stories) includes such masterpieces as “Prelude,” “At the Bay” “Bliss,” “The Man Without a Temperament” and “The Garden Party” and has a new introduction by Jeffrey Meyers.


The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster

For Milo, everything’s a bore. When a tollbooth mysteriously appears in his room, he drives through only because he’s got nothing better to do. But on the other side, things seem different. Milo visits the Island of Conclusions (you get there by jumping), learns about time from a ticking watchdog named Tock, and even embarks on a quest to rescue Rhyme and Reason! Somewhere along the way, Milo realizes something astonishing. Life is far from dull. In fact, it’s exciting beyond his wildest dreams. . . .



Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

Humbert Humbert – scholar, aesthete and romantic – has fallen completely and utterly in love with Lolita Haze, his landlady’s gum-snapping, silky skinned twelve-year-old daughter. Reluctantly agreeing to marry Mrs Haze just to be close to Lolita, Humbert suffers greatly in the pursuit of romance; but when Lo herself starts looking for attention elsewhere, he will carry her off on a desperate cross-country misadventure, all in the name of Love. Hilarious, flamboyant, heart-breaking and full of ingenious word play, Lolita is an immaculate, unforgettable masterpiece of obsession, delusion and lust.


Like the Red Panda by Andrea Seigel

Stella Parrish is seventeen, attractive, smart, deeply alienated, and unable to countenance life’s absurdities. She is not nihilistic; she is prematurely exhausted. Since her parents OD’d on designer drugs when she was eleven, she has lived with well-meaning but inexperienced foster parents, while her grandfather, her only living relative, tries ever more ingenious ways of committing suicide in his retirement home. Here are the last two weeks of Stella’s senior year in Orange County, California: the intensive AP final exams; the childish, celebratory trips; the totemic importance attached to graduation. Beneath Stella’s mordantly funny take on her life is the decisiveness with which she disengages from it, planting clues and providing explanations for those who will try to understand the act she is about to commit. With perfect pitch, remarkable wit, and a spare, vivid prose, Stella turns her farewell to suburbia into a wry philosophical inquiry.


The Ultimate Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Addams

At last in paperback in one complete volume, here are the five novels from Douglas Adams’s Hitchhiker series.

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy Seconds before the Earth is demolished for a galactic freeway, Arthur Dent is saved by Ford Prefect, a researcher for the revised Guide. Together they stick out their thumbs to the stars and begin a wild journey through time and space.

The Restaurant at the End of the Universe Facing annihilation at the hands of warmongers is a curious time to crave tea. It could only happen to the cosmically displaced Arthur Dent and his comrades as they hurtle across the galaxy in a desperate search for a place to eat:

Life, the Universe and Everything The unhappy inhabitants of planet Krikkit are sick of looking at the night sky- so they plan to destroy it. The universe, that is. Now only five individuals can avert Armageddon: mild-mannered Arthur Dent and his stalwart crew.

So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish Back on Earth, Arthur Dent is ready to believe that the past eight years were all just a figment of his stressed-out imagination. But a gift-wrapped fishbowl with a cryptic inscription conspires to thrust him back to reality. So to speak.

Mostly Harmless Just when Arthur Dent makes the terrible mistake of starting to enjoy life, all hell breaks loose. Can he save the Earth from total obliteration? Can he save the Guide from a hostile alien takeover? Can he save his daughter from herself?

Also includes the short story “Young Zaphod Plays It Safe”.


We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson

Merricat Blackwood lives on the family estate with her sister Constance and her Uncle Julian. Not long ago there were seven Blackwoods—until a fatal dose of arsenic found its way into the sugar bowl one terrible night. Acquitted of the murders, Constance has returned home, where Merricat protects her from the curiosity and hostility of the villagers. Their days pass in happy isolation until cousin Charles appears. Only Merricat can see the danger, and she must act swiftly to keep Constance from his grasp..







Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk by David Sedaris

Featuring David Sedaris’s unique blend of hilarity and heart, this new collection of keen-eyed animal-themed tales is an utter delight. Though the characters may not be human, the situations in these stories bear an uncanny resemblance to the insanity of everyday life.

The Woman Destroyed by Simone de Beauvoir

Three long stories that draw the reader into the lives of three women, all past their first youth, all facing unexpected crises.

On Being Blue by William H. Gass

In a philosophical approach to color, William Gass explores man’s perception of the color blue as well as its common erotic, symbolic, and emotional associations.

The Dark Secret of Weatherend by John Bellairs

When Anthony Monday stumbles upon the diary of J.K. Borkman, he thinks he’s unearthed a worthless piece of junk. But Borkman’s mysterious writings turn out to be much more–plans to turn the world into an icy wasteland. By the time ghastly weather sets in and Anthony realizes it’s Borkman’s fanatical son who is bent on carrying out his father’s horrific work, it may be too late to stop him.

Christmas at Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons

Available for the first time since its original publication more than fifty years ago, Christmas at Cold Comfort Farm is a charming collection whose hilarious title story features Christmas dinner with the Starkadders before Flora’s arrival. With Adam playing Santa while draped in Mrs. Starkadders’s shawls, the family shares their traditional “Christmas pudding”-a mélange containing random objects of doom foretelling the coming year: a coffin nail for death, a bad sixpence for financial ruin, and a menthol cone to indicate that the lucky recipient will go “blind wi’ headache.” These lively tales will delight anyone who loves Stella Gibbons and her signature wit.

Why Not Me? by Mindy Kaling

In Why Not Me?, Kaling shares her ongoing journey to find contentment and excitement in her adult life, whether it’s falling in love at work, seeking new friendships in lonely places, attempting to be the first person in history to lose weight without any behavior modification whatsoever, or most important, believing that you have a place in Hollywood when you’re constantly reminded that no one looks like you.

The Girl on The Train by Paula Hawkins

Rachel catches the same commuter train every morning. She knows it will wait at the same signal each time, overlooking a row of back gardens. She’s even started to feel like she knows the people who live in one of the houses. “Jess and Jason,” she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. If only Rachel could be that happy. And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Now Rachel has a chance to become a part of the lives she’s only watched from afar. Now they’ll see; she’s much more than just the girl on the train…

In the Café of Lost Youth by Patrick Modiano

The daughter of a single mother who works in the Moulin Rouge, Louki grows up in poverty in Montmartre. Her one attempt to escape her background fails when she is rejected from the Lycée Jules-Ferry. She meanders on through life, into a cocaine habit, and begins frequenting the Café Condé, whose regulars call her “Louki”. She drifts into marriage with a real estate agency director, but finds no satisfaction with him or his friends and so makes the simple decision not to return to him one evening. She turns instead to a young man almost as aimless and adrift as she, but who perhaps loves her all the same.

Nightingale Wood by Stella Gibbons

Life is not quite a fairytale for poor Viola. Left penniless, the young widow is forced to live with her late husband’s family in a joyless old house. There’s Mr Wither, a tyrannical old miser, Mrs Wither, who thinks Viola is just a common shop girl, and two unlovely sisters-in-law, one of whom is in love with the chauffeur.

IT by Stephen King

Welcome to Derry, Maine … It’s a small city, a place as hauntingly familiar as your own hometown. Only in Derry the haunting is real … They were seven teenagers when they first stumbled upon the horror. Now they are grown-up men and women who have gone out into the big world to gain success and happiness. But none of them can withstand the force that has drawn them back to Derry to face the nightmare without an end, and the evil without a name.

Selected Letters by Seneca

Seneca’s letters to his friend Lucilius are powerful moral essays that also yield illuminating insight into Seneca’s personal life and the truly turbulent times in which he lived. One of the great Stoic philosophers, Seneca here guides Lucilius’ struggle to achieve wisdom and serenity, uninfluenced by worldly emotions. He advises his friend on how to do without what is superfluous, whether in terms of happiness, riches, reputation, or the emotions.

Blackout: Remembering the Things I Drank to Forget by Sarah Hepola

A memoir of unblinking honesty and poignant, laugh-out-loud humor, Blackout is the story of a woman stumbling into a new kind of adventure—the sober life she never wanted. Shining a light into her blackouts, she discovers the person she buried, as well as the confidence, intimacy, and creativity she once believed came only from a bottle. Her tale will resonate with anyone who has been forced to reinvent or struggled in the face of necessary change. It’s about giving up the thing you cherish most—but getting yourself back in return.

Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walter

The story begins in 1962. On a rocky patch of the sun-drenched Italian coastline, a young innkeeper, chest-deep in daydreams, looks out over the incandescent waters of the Ligurian Sea and spies an apparition: a tall, thin woman, a vision in white, approaching him on a boat. She is an actress, he soon learns, an American starlet, and she is dying.

Franny and Zooey by JD Salinger

The short story, Franny, takes place in an unnamed college town and tells the tale of an undergraduate who is becoming disenchanted with the selfishness and inauthenticity she perceives all around her. The novella, Zooey, is named for Zooey Glass, the second-youngest member of the Glass family. As his younger sister, Franny, suffers a spiritual and existential breakdown in her parents’ Manhattan living room — leaving Bessie, her mother, deeply concerned — Zooey comes to her aid, offering what he thinks is brotherly love, understanding, and words of sage advice.

How to Be Parisian Wherever You Are by Anne Berest et al.

From four stunning and accomplished French women–at last–a fresh and spirited take on what it really means to be a Parisienne: how they dress, entertain, have fun and attempt to behave themselves.

Dracula by Bram Stoker

The story is told in epistolary form, tracing the journey of the young solicitor Jonathan Harker as he travels to the Carpathian Mountains, his subsequent imprisonment in Dracula’s castle, the Count’s arrival in England, and the battle fought between the vampire and a small group of men and women led by Professor Abraham Van Helsing.

The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde’s only novel was first published in 1890 in the July edition of Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine, and examined the interrelationships between art, life, and consequence, challenging Victorian conventions and shocking many readers. Many reviewers criticized its decadence, the call to believe in “art for art’s sake”, and its moral ambiguity. Yet still today it has power to enthrall, the very nature of sin explored through the tale of a young man who sells his soul for a lifetime of beauty, his debauchery manifest only on his portrait, every transgression a blemish or sign of aging.

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Begun when the author was only eighteen, and conceived from a nightmare, Frankenstein is the deeply disturbing story of a monstrous creation which has terrified readers since its first publication in 1818. The novel has seared its way into the popular imagination, and established itself as one of the pioneering works of modern science fiction.



Recent Projects
  • Dollface
    Dollface 2019-
    Jules Wiley
    Season 2 in production
    After breaking up with her longtime boyfriend, a woman tries to reconnect with the friends she lost during the relationship.
  • WandaVision
    WandaVision 2021
    Darcy Lewis
    Out now
    The series is a blend of classic television and the Marvel Cinematic Universe in which Wanda Maximoff and Vision—two super-powered beings living idealized suburban lives—begin to suspect that everything is not as it seems.
  • Friendsgiving
    Friendsgiving 2020
    Abby
    Out now
    Glamorous, newly-divorced actor Molly and her recently-dumped lesbian best friend Abby, along with their motley crew of close friends and strange acquaintances, host a dysfunctional, comical and chaotic Thanksgiving dinner.
  • The Sandman
    The Sandman 2020-
    Death of the Endless
    Premieres 22 September
    When The Sandman, also known as Lord Morpheus—the immortal king of dreams, stories and the imagination—is pulled from his realm and imprisoned on Earth by a nefarious cult, he languishes for decades before finally escaping. Once free, he must retrieve the three "tools" that will restore his power and help him to rebuild his dominion, which has deteriorated in his absence.
  • Big Mouth
    Big Mouth 2017-
    Leah Birch
    Season 4 out now
    Teenage friends find their lives upended by the wonders and horrors of puberty.
  • What If…?
    What If…? 2021
    Darcy Lewis
    Out now
    Exploring pivotal moments from the Marvel Cinematic Universe and turning them on their head, leading the audience into uncharted territory.
Marvel Family
Spindrift Partnership
IS THAT A GENUINE SMILE COMING OUT OF MY FACE?! IT IS THE SMILE OF SOMEONE WHO FINALLY HOODWINKED HER FAVORITE BEVERAGE INTO SPONSORING HER…IT’S SPINDRIFT SPARKLING WATER, BABY. Never in my life have I approached a brand ASKING to partner with them out of sheer adoration. As a passionate (yet not remotely professional) gardener, I’ve become obsessed with only allowing REAL FRUIT (not “natural flavor” – actual fruit) into my consumables. Once I realized that everything I was drinking was “flavored”, I went on the hunt. I discovered @drinkspindrift which is the FIRST sparkling water made with 100% ONLY REAL SQUEEZED FRUIT and I became an absolute psycho, slowly converting my friends and family to the Drifter lifestyle. I may be part Spindrift at this point, as it is actually the only water I drink. Anyway. More to come. #realfruittastesbetter#spindriftpartner
Learn more
Donate

Your contribution will help the site stay online and expand its contents. Thank you ♡

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com
Kat Supports
Best Friends Animal Society North Shore Animal League
Counters
  • 0
  • 27
  • 2,864
  • 135,461
Information

Admin Sparrow
Contact katdenningsorg (at) gmail (dot) com
Established 1st January 2020
Listed Fansite Directory